DALLAS TWP. — Stanley J. Dudrick, medical director of Misericordia University’s physician assistant program and professor of surgery at The Commonwealth Medical College in Scranton, has been named one of 50 most influential physicians in history by Medscape.

Medscape, a division of the WebMD Health Professional Network, named the Nanticoke native 42nd in the ranking for his research that led to the invention of intravenous hyperalimentation, “a central venous feeding technique to help patients with gastrointestinal tract impairments,” a news release reported.

Dudrick’s medical technique is used worldwide to prevent malnutrition in patients unable to receive necessary nutrients through their digestive system.

Dudrick was named a “living legend” by the International Society of Small Bowel Transplantation and received over 120 honors and awards. He also participated in a video series by the American College of Surgeons called “Heroes in Surgery: Our Legacy,” according to the release.

Dudrick earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology and graduated cum laude from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster. He received a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

Dudrick is chairman emeritus in the Department of Surgery and director emeritus of Program in Surgery at St. Mary’s Hospital, a teaching hospital affiliated with Yale University. He is also a professor emeritus of surgery at Yale University School of Medicine, according to the news release.

Reach Eileen Godin at 570-991-6387 or on Twitter @TLNews.

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Misericordia University medical director named one of 50 most influential physicians by Medscape

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